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Photo by Hannah Baade|The Beacon

                                                                                                                                                                                           

A TV panel discussion that will air on ESPN2 and ESPN Deportes on Oct. 12 will feature Beacon Editor-in-Chief Malika Andrews.

 Andrews, a senior, will appear with two other panelists discussing women in sports during the 4-minute segment, which will be taped at ABC studios in New York City on Oct. 9. The segment will be part of an hour-long “One Nacion” special marking Hispanic Heritage month.
 
ESPN SportsCenter anchor Toni Collins will moderate the panel, which will also feature  journalist Denny Alfonso, who covered the Rio Olympics for ESPN, and a prominent female athlete yet-to-be announced. Andrews will speak from the point of view of a college woman covering sports.
 
Andrews received the invitation from ESPN while attending the recent Online News Association (ONA) conference in Denver with Beacon adviser Nancy Copic and three other student journalists from The Beacon. She made her initial contact with ESPN at a convention she attended with Beacon staff a year earlier.
 
“The Beacon put me in a position to succeed,” Andrews says. “On the most basic level, The Beacon allowed me to go to ONA and network with people at ESPN. And on a larger scale, I’ve learned the journalistic writing and reporting skills I need to be noticed.”
 
Andrews, who is from Oakland, Calif., joined The Beacon as a sports reporter during fall semester of her sophomore year. She was promoted to Sports Editor the following semester. University President Fr. Mark Poorman appointed Andrews Editor-in-Chief of The Beacon last February.
 
 
Last summer, Andrews was one of 12 college journalists in the nation selected to take part in the Sports Journalism Institute, which hosts a one-week journalism workshop, then places the college journalists in paid internships in major media organizations. In her internship in the sports department at The Denver Post , Andrews covered the Las Vegas NBA Summer League, the NBA Draft and the Denver Broncos training camp.
 
The previous summer, Andrews was an intern at KOIN-TV, the CBS affiliate in Portland.
 
Andrews’ reporting for The Beacon has won awards at the national level, most recently the National Association of Black Journalists’ Salute to Excellence Award for collegiate sports reporting. Last spring she won Best Writing and Best Sports story in the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association collegiate awards.
 
Andrews is one of 9 students in the country to receive a Sinclair Broadcast Group Diversity Scholarship and 1 of 4 recipients of a national Associated Press Sports Editors Scholarship.
 
Somehow, Andrews manages to juggle all this while supervising more than 2 dozen student staffers and overseeing The Beacon’s transition to an all-digital media outlet.  She credits The Beacon with getting her this far.
 
“I wasn’t expecting to be featured on network television as an undergraduate, ” she says.  “But now that I do have that opportunity, The Beacon has put me in a spot where I feel confident enough in my skills to accept.”
 
You can watch Andrews’ segment Oct. 12 at 4 p.m.(PST) on ESPN2 and online after that.
-Nancy Copic, Ass’t Director for Student Media

 

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The Beacon NY delegation: Cheyenne Schoen, Ben Arthur, Nancy Copic, Clare Duffy, Malika Andrews and Rachel Rippetoe

The Beacon NY delegation: Cheyenne Schoen, Ben Arthur, Nancy Copic, Clare Duffy, Malika Andrews and Rachel Rippetoe

By Nancy Copic, Beacon adviser

A few conference highlights compiled from 19 (!) pages of handwritten notes:

Keynote: Byron Pitts, reporter for ABC’s “Nightline”

This keynote was more inspirational than many sermons I’ve heard, and I’ve heard a lot of them. Byron Pitts may tell stories for a living, but his personal story is as compelling as any he’s reported as a network correspondent.

Raised by a young, low-income single mother in Baltimore, Pitts said he didn’t learn how to read until he was 12 or 13. Around that time, a “specialist” diagnosed him as mentally retarded and advised his mother to institutionalize him.  “Because you’re a person of limited means,” Pitts quoted the man as saying, “we recommend you put him an an institution.”

His mother wouldn’t have it, didn’t do that. What she did is take her boy to church.  A lot. She also wore a pendant in the shape of a mustard seed, a symbol of the faith that guides Pitts today.

“Raised Baptist, educated Catholic,” he says.

Pitts

Pitts ended up at Ohio Wesleyan University, where, as Pitts puts it, a professor saved his life. But first, another one told him he didn’t have what it took to succeed there. That news hit him hard, left him crying in a hallway on campus. Another professor, who was new to campus, noticed him crying and asked what was wrong. When he told her what the other professor said, she set him straight and told him not to give up. He stayed and he graduated.

Flash forward decades. Pitt is a famous Emmy-winning television journalist and he’s on the Board of Trustees at Ohio Wesleyan, who invites him to speak at graduation. Pitts tells his story at the ceremony, including the part about the professor who made him cry. After his speech, that professor, humbled and contrite walks up to him and tells him he’s sorry.

Did I mentioned he also was a stutterer when he was younger? “Being a stutterer has made me a better listener, ” he says

What bothers him? Indifference. He sees journalism an antidote.

“My profession needs you,” he said to the room full of student journalists from all over the country. “You are needed not just to speak the truth. You’re needed to help this world be better.”

Pitts thinks one of the most remarkable stories is about the resilience of the African American people as a race.

“I am the hope and dream of a slave,” he said. “My worst day is the best day for my great grandparents.”

Also, he writes thank you notes to everyone he interviews.

I think that’s remarkable. So is the fact that he stayed at least two hours to talk one-on-one with students who lined up to chat with him.

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Of course, Malika was one of them.

FBI Strategies of Interviewing

This was engaging. Clare, Cheyenne and Malika also gave it good reviews. Here are the strategies:

  1. Withhold judgment- Keep your feelings to yourself. Monitor your posture and tone. Give your source room to be who they are. (Verbal abuse does not work.)
  2. “Joining” Use language that shows you understand things from the other person’s perspective.
  3. “Mirroring”- Mimic body posture of the person you’re interviewing. If he leans back, you lean back (but not right away.)
  4.  Show curiosity- Use your body to show your curiosity. Nod at what they’re saying.
  5. Active Listening-Resist the urge to formulate your next question.
  6. Pay attention to personality types. Are they “thinking” types or “feeling” types?

Bonus tip for students: If your nervous for the interview, tell your source. It may create empathy.

 

Rachel, Cheyenne and Ben show their Beacon pride outside the theatre where Stephen Cobert does The Late Show

Rachel, Cheyenne and Ben show their Beacon pride outside the theatre where Stephen Colbert does The Late Show

Glossy Standards-The Ethics of Magazine Reporting and Editing

This panel featured:

  • Deborah Blum, Pulitzer-Prize winning science journalist and director of the Knight Science Journalism Program at MIT
  • Hank Hersch, assistant managing editor at Sports Illustrated
  • Andrew Seaman, chair of the ethics committee for the Society of Professional Journalists and senior medical journalist for Reuters in NYC
  • Derek Kravitz, contributing writer and news editor at The Wall Street Journal; researcher/instructor at Columbia University School of Journalism

The focus of this panel was fact checking and ethical debacles such as the Rolling Stone Rape story that was later discredited and actor Sean Penn’s (called “the ultimate freelancer.” by Andrew Seaman) much-maligned profile of drug lord El Chappo Guzman.

One interesting tidbit; If you’re a reporter for the Wall Street Journal and your published story needs to be corrected, the process is “incredibly embarrassing,” according to Derek Kravitz. You have to fill out a long form, which is circulated among several editors.

Andrews Seaman,Deboarh Blum ,Derek Kravitz and Hank Hersch

Andrews Seaman,Deboarh Blum ,Derek Kravitz and Hank Hersch

Big takeaway:”Keep that skeptical part of your brain always active.”

Beacon staffers getting their fact check on

Beacon staffers getting their fact check on

I lucked out with my chaperoning assignment. I escorted a group of students (from various universities from across the country) on a tour of the New York Times.

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Due to security concerns, we were not allowed to take photographs in the newsroom. But the lobby is interesting and was fair game. There’s a unique electronic art display that siphons words and phrases from the NYT’s 150+ years of archives and runs them like electronic teletypes across dozens of mounted screens that look like elongated smart phones.

In the lobby of the New York Times

Another interesting symbolic architectural element of the building: There are two banks of elevators. One for the editorial staffers, the other for people who work in sales and marketing. Get it? The business side should never mesh with the editorial side. Or so that was the thinking way back in 2007.

The courtyard (or “lobby garden”) of the building features sedges, ferns and birch trees, an earthy contrast to the surrounding steel and glass.

 

Birch trees and grass grow within the TImes complex.

One of the most relevant sessions at the conference was called “Manage Your Digital Workflow.” It was presented by Roman Heindorff, founder of Camayak.

Tips I found most relevant here:

  • Brand every piece of content.
  • Improve the access outside contributors have to pitch ideas to your newsroom
  • Only invest in writers you see a future with. You can’t keep shoving resources at people who just kind of stick around the newsroom and don’t grow.
  • Show reporters their metrics; show them their stories relative to their peers
  • Reward people. Incentivize (pizza?)
  • While working on a story is a good time to start promoting the story vis social media to get a buzz going.

And in our down time, we went to The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore. The topic of the night: Donald Trump’s racist supporters

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Cheyenne, Ben, Malika, Nancy and Clare in TImes Square. Rachel was touring CBS.

Cheyenne, Ben, Malika, Nancy and Clare in Times Square. Rachel was touring CBS.

One more thing: The Beacon came in Second Place in the Apple Awards. Not bad!

-Nancy Copic, Ass’t Director for Student Media

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Investigative reporter Les Zaitz, who heads The Oregonian’s investigative team and a two-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, visited the newsroom last week.LesZaitzTeaching

Les has uncovered the workings of Mexican drug cartels flooding Oregon with heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine. He’s exposed corruption in Oregon’s prison system and was on the hit list of the Rajneeshees in the 1980s as he reported on the inner workings of their central Oregon commune. So he knows a thing or two about digging up compelling information.

Here’s a recap of some of the advice he shared with Beacon staff.

  1. “Shut up and listen” during interviews. Let there be silence at the end of the person’s answer to your question, even if it feels awkward.
  2. Arrive prepared: Know what information you want out of the interview and bring a list of questions
  3. Avoid email interviews (except to get certain facts.)
  4. Tell the people you want to interview, “We are doing the story” and “I just want to make sure I get it right.”
  5. Don’t ask yes/no questions.
  6. If you ask a general question, you’ll get a general answer.
  7. Details make a story good. Dig for interesting ones.
  8. Never mislead a source about what your story is about.
  9. Appeal to people’s humanity. Do what you can to earn their trust.
  10. If someone is upset, put the notebook down for a while.
  11. If you’re not 100 percent sure what a person meant when they said something, ask them to clarify it for you. Don’t worry about looking stupid. They will usually respect you when they see you are striving to get the story right.
  12. Get documents if relevant to the story.
  13. At the end of every interview, ask if there is anything else that’s important or interesting to know about the story.

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LesZaitzShirt

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It started with a tweet from Ryan Frank, publisher at Emerald Media Group, which publishes the University of Oregon’s student newspaper and website, The Daily Emerald.photo 1 Editor-in-Chief of The Beacon Kelsey Thomas saw that, and set off her own flurry of tweets…photo ephoto dphoto cphotophoto bphoto 4photo a“Yay” is right. The Beacon is a finalist for the Associated Collegiate Press Pacemaker Award, a national award that’s been given out for 86 years and widely considered to be the most prestigious award in college media. 

There are three categories: daily newspaper,  non-daily newspaper and two-year (community college) newspapers. The Beacon, in the non-daily category, is in impressive company.

Among the 22 colleges and universities whose student newspapers are finalists for the non-daily Pacemaker Award:  Massachusetts Institute of Technology,  Boston College, George Washington University, University of Oregon, Wake Forest University, Johns Hopkins University, and Washington University in St. Louis. Not too shabby.

Finalists in the daily category include Northwestern University, Harvard, Penn State, University of Pennsylvania, Rutgers, and University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. You get the idea.

According to ACP, the staff of the esteemed Miami Herald judged this year’s entries on:

  • coverage and content
  • quality of writing and reporting
  • leadership on the opinion page
  • evidence of in-depth reporting
  • layout and design
  • photography, art and graphics

You can read more about the judges’ criteria here.

Pacemaker winners in the non-daily category in recent years include student newspapers from University of Chicago, Boston College, Washington University, Santa Clara University, Butler University, Loyola Marymount University, San Francisco State University and Villanova University.

The Associated Collegiate Press will announce this year’s Pacemaker winners at the ACP convention in New Orleans on Oct. 26.

Yay!

-Nancy Copic, Adviser to The Beacon

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The Beacon has won 10 regional Mark of Excellence awards from the Society of Professional Journalists. The competition includes collegiate newspapers from Oregon, Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. The Beacon competed in the “small” university/college category (5000 or fewer undergrads).

What we don’t know is whether the awards were for First, Second or Third Place. That will be announced at the SPJ regional conference at Gonzaga the weekend of April 13. First Place finishers advance to the national SPJ Mark of Excellence competition.

Here’s the list of award-winners from The Beacon:

Editorial Writing – Caitlin Yilek
Best All-Around Non Daily Student Newspaper  – Beacon staff
Breaking News Photography “She said yes!” -Jackie Jeffers
Feature Photography  “The story behind the ink” by Giovanna Solano
Feature Writing “Molly’s Legacy: Hope for Haiti” – Kate Stringer
General Column Writing Sarah Hansell, Amanda Munro & Lydia Laythe
General News Reporting “Access Denied” – Phillip Ellefson
General News Reporting “Students Cooperate but still can’t party”-Kelsey Thomas
In-Depth Reporting “What’s in our air?” – Rosemary Peters
Sports Photography “Round Two!” -Jackie Jeffers

-Nancy Copic

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Good morning New York from the Times Square Sheraton.

Good morning New York from the Times Square Sheraton.

About fifteen minutes into a session about working with faculty and administration at private schools, I noticed that all fifteen blazer-clad students around me were leaning forward in their seats, nodding and compulsively scribbling notes.

I think I found my people.

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Who says print is dead?

Being surrounded by hundreds of college journalists with similar interests and passions, not to mention facing similar problems daily in their newsrooms, and attending lectures by people who have “made it,” all in the amazing setting of New York City has been an indescribable experience. The End.

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Walking the streets.

Just kidding – I will do my best to describe it but please know it is better than I convey. Here are a few of my top lessons from day 1:

 The media is still a great place to be:

Keynote speaker William Geist talked about how journalism is such a dynamic industry that, despite what we are told, has many opportunities for us if we work hard enough. Here are a few of my favorite quotes:

  • Yes you are hearing that newspapers are dead, but there are so many exciting opportunities. Get in the door. Keep your head down. Work heard. Show a work ethic and a willingness to do what it takes.

  • Anybody you talk to who has made it in media has some version of the story where they felt stuck and under appreciated.

  • If you stop being hungry and curious and you just want to hang out with all the cool people and get invited to cocktail parties, then maybe it’s time to start thinking about doing something else.

Me covering "Occupy Wall Street." A wee bit late.

Me covering “Occupy Wall Street.” A wee bit late.

I love design  / design is a writers best friend / if you make it hard for a reader to read your paper, they probably wont:

I couldn’t decide between the three titles so I didn’t. I promise no stories in The Beacon next year will have three titles. But all three are true – GO DESIGN. As primarily a writer, I was excited to immerse myself in design during the first day of the conference. The following notes are a compilation of ideas from the session “Chicken Noodle Soup 1” and a private Beacon critique Joey and I attended with the very experienced Gary Metzker.

  • White space is your friend. It makes your paper look more professional and easier to read.
  • Keep the headline and the deck together in news articles. In living, it is okay to split them up. Put fillers and ads towards the bottom and right. Avoid using more than one pull quote per story or page unless it is a very long story.
  • Photography is not just about getting the right shot. Where and how you place the photo is very important. The best photo and story always go on the front page. Always. The front page picture should also feature students. Apparently students won’t be fighting over the newspaper stands when old white guys shaking hands or sitting in a cubicle are on the front. Who knew? If the front page photo is good enough, it alone can carry the page. Always put the caption and byline below the photo, not in it. Avoid using multiple photos of the same size on the same page or putting photos by ads.

When all else fails (even technology), doodle the pope.

Private schools like UP are required to post a variety of forms online.

    • Clery Act: includes a crime log and statistical report for the last three years of crime.
    • IRS 9-90: searchable data about financial details about the school
    • Ed.gov: by searching “Equity in Athletics” and reading the form UP filled out as required by the NCAA, we discovered that coaches of women sports teams make significantly less than coaches of male sports teams at UP. There’s a story idea right there!

    Don't tell me you didn't rush to the Public Library first thing when getting into town too.

    Don’t tell me you didn’t rush to the Public Library first thing when getting into town too.

  • We don’t suck!
  • Although this is pretty obvious (cough *Columbia Awards* cough), this conference definitely confirmed that we are doing a lot of things right.  Improving writing and design is a continual process, but I am lucky to be joining Ed Board next year on such a thriving, successful paper.
  • And that is only day one.
  • IMG_3363
  • Cheers!
  • Kelsey Thomas

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The Beacon took home 22 (!) awards from the statewide collegiate competition sponsored by the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association, including nine FIRST PLACE awards in the following categories:

  • Best Writing- Laura Frazier
  • Best News Story- Consequences: Drinking without thinking by Laura Frazier
  • Best Feature Story- Back to The Bluff after ‘Big Bang’ break by Natalie Wheeler
  • Best Sports Story- Finding the balance by Bruce Garlinghouse
  • Best Section- Hannah Gray, Rosemary Peters
  • Best Special Section- Elizabeth Tertadian, Sarah Hansell, Kate Peifer, Sports staff
  • Best Series- Rip City Classic by Jason Hortsch, Kyle Cape-Lindelin, Bruce Garlinghouse, John McCarty
  • Best Columnist- Caitlin Yilek
  • Best Spot News Photo- Christina Nelson

Laura Frazier, Natalie Wheeler, Shellie Adams, Jason Hortsch, Liz Tertadian and Rosemary Peters bask in the glory after the ONPA awards ceremony on May 11.

The Beacon won the following SECOND PLACE AWARDS:

  • Best Writing – Natalie Wheeler
  • Best Feature- Impossible is nothing by Laura Frazier
  • General Excellence
  • Best Series- Bon Appetit by Natalie Wheeler, Will Lyons, Rachel McIntosh
  • Best Review- Po’Shines by Jocelyne LaFortune and Caitlin Yilek
  • Best Cartooning- Ann Truong
  • Best House Ad- Student Media Open House by Rosemary Peters

Honorable Mention:

  • Best Section- Catilin Yilek, Rosemary Peters
  • Best News Story- Would you pay $6.95 for this? by Natalie Wheeler
  • Best Editorial- Caitlin Yilek and Rosemary Peters
  • Best Graphic- Shellie Adams
  • Best Sports Photo- Bill Michielsen
  • Best Cartooning- Ann Truong

Congratulations everyone!

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